Program Statistics & Successes

Results matter. If lives do not change, we have not done our job. We take the results of the families in our programs seriously, measuring our success in achieving our goals in the changed lives of the people we serve.

The impact of the ongoing economic downturn causes us to become even more creative as we adjust and strategize so that we can continue our critical services for homeless families. As we make adjustments to our budget, form new partnerships, leverage relationships, and vigorously pursue new donors, our focus remains to respond to the growing requests from families with the same high quality programs as always.

We have seen a broader range of family needs than ever before. We have always assisted families who grew up in poverty, clients with fairly high barriers to gaining and retaining living wage jobs and consistently providing for the needs of their families. Now we are serving many more families that are homeless for the first time, clients who never considered asking for public assistance before. They are a reflection of the depth of the economic crisis in America.

We have worked for many years to help very low income families confront and overcome obstacles to housing and self-sufficiency and we are proud of the effectiveness of our programs. Recent challenges of greater need and far fewer job opportunities caused us to consider how we could accomplish more. In response to the employment crisis, we added a full-time employment specialist in 2011. She is assisted by a volunteer with 20+ years of human resources experience at Weyerhaeuser and Milgard for 30 hours a month. They have developed a wrap-around employment program available to each adult in our housing programs, and have seen exciting successes in the months since the program was initiated.

Education, employment, and financial literacy are the focus for family clients at Helping Hand House in addition to stable housing, basic needs, life skills, and intensive case management. All families receive financial literacy training, even those who come to us for one-time rental assistance. Our basic class has been in place for many years. We decided to enrich it for those families in our housing programs. Those families can now enroll in our seven month class that covers basic financial literacy as well as the more in depth information about banking, asset building, investing, credit building and repair, financing options, first time home buyer, and other topics. We are also working with two banks to begin an Asset Building program and to provide financial literacy training for the children.

All clients are encouraged to complete educations and to enroll in programs that will make it possible for them to develop a career and become upwardly mobile. In the past few years, as the competition for fewer and fewer jobs increased, we continued emphasizing the importance of education and more clients are going to school.

The following are 2011 program statistics related to the various housing and assistance programs offered at Helping Hand House.

Homelessness Prevention (Duration: 3 months, 2011 Statistics)

Total Assisted: 143 families (198 adults and 316 children)
– Rental Assistance: 109 families
– Utility Assistance: 34 families
– 84% successfully remained in their housing after 3 months

Emergency Housing (Duration: 3 months, 2011 Statistics)

Total Assisted: 26 families (35 adults and 42 children)
– 84% of graduating clients exited into permanent housing (unsubsidized or subsidized)
– 64% of families served were single mothers
– 30% reduction in families receiving TANF after program – a significant savings for WA taxpayers
– Employment doubled for families after program (from 7 at entry to 14 at exit)
– 11 adults enrolled or attended training or educational program during stay in program
– 25 children were provided with school clothes and supplies (NOTE: Remaining balance of children were not of school age)
– 8 children attended a summer camp
– 16 children participated in after-school activities
– 6 children received counseling
– Every family saved more than $150 during their time in the program, including 4 who saved over $500 towards their next housing.

Transitional Housing (Duration: 24 months, 2011 Statistics)

Total Assisted: 36 families (52 adults and 79 children)
– 61% of families served were single mothers
– 24% increase in employment for families after program
– 19 adults enrolled or attended training or educational program during stay in program
– 61 children were provided with school clothes and supplies (NOTE: Remaining balance of children were not of school age)
– 4 children attended a summer camp
– 23 children participated in after-school activities
– 7 children received counseling
– 4 children received tutoring
– Families saved between $450 and $2,300 during their time in the program, including 4 who saved over $500 towards their next housing.

Rapid Re-Housing (Duration: Varied from 3-18 months, 2011 Statistics)

Total Assisted: 26 families (31 adults and 52 children)
– 26 families served (31 adults, 52 children)
– 16 single female head of households
– 81% of families served were single parents, most of whom were single mothers
– 82% reduction in families receiving TANF after program – a significant savings for WA taxpayers
– 11 families employed at exit making $1,000-$4,000 per month
– Every family saved more than $150 during their time in the program, including 8 who saved over $500 towards their next housing, and 3 saving over $1,000.

Permanent Supportive Housing (Duration: Varied, 2011 Statistics)

Total Assisted: 14 families (18 adults and 24 children)
– 79% of families served were single parents, most of whom were single mothers
– Average income increased by 22% for families after program
– 10 adults enrolled or attended training or educational program during stay in program
– 24 children were provided with school clothes and supplies
– 6 children attended a summer camp
– 22 children participated in after-school activities
– 5 children received counseling
– 4 children received tutoring
– 5 children attended swimming lessons
– Every family saved more than $150 during their time in the program, including 4 who saved over $500 towards their next housing.